"Why We Remember: Commemorating Dark Days in Human History"

Monday, October 3, 2005

Presented by the American Jewish Archives and The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center 

Distance learning participants will take part in milestone event from the new Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati International Learning Center at the American Jewish Archives. 

Monday, November 7 - 9 pm
Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion
3101 Clifton Avenue
Cincinnati, Ohio 45220 

The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives and The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center will present, Why We Remember: Commemorating Dark Days in Human History. The interactive discussion, featuring Dr. Ari Goldman, a nationally recognized expert in religion and journalism, and Carl Westmoreland, Senior Advisor for Historic Preservation at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, will offer scholarly perspectives into the societal benefits of recalling dark days in human history. 

This educational event marks the first time in the College-Institute's 130-year history that audiences situated in remote cities will be able to actively participate in a campus-based program. In addition to the on-site audience in Cincinnati, audiences from the Cleveland College of Jewish Studies in Cleveland, Ohio, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. will be virtually present during the speaker's presentation and subsequent interactive discussion. 

"Extraordinary educational programs - such as "Why We Remember" are now possible at the Marcus Center since the completion of The Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati International Learning Center -- a technologically advanced lecture and learning facility," said Dr. Gary P. Zola, Executive Director of The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives and Associate Professor of the American Jewish Experience at Hebrew Union College. The new Center, which opened in June of 2005, features integrated electronic components with satellite transmission and receiving capabilities, enhanced interactive video projection and sound systems, a large video monitor, telephone, fax line, and high-speed internet access. 

"It is expected that many area educational institutions and community organizations will seek to utilize this outstanding venue for education and outreach programming," Dr. Zola continued. "The existence of The Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati International Learning Center makes it possible for us to bring local, national and even international audiences to Cincinnati and The Marcus Center in exciting new ways." 

The November 7th program will begin with formal presentations by Dr. Goldman, a featured speaker in the National Foundation for Jewish Culture's Key Textsseries; and Mr. Westmoreland. An interactive discussion with all participants-those in Cincinnati as well as the distance learners-will follow the speakers' presentations. 

Dr. Goldman's presentation will focus on A. M. Rosenthal's 1959 feature article in the New York Times Magazine which was one of the first calls for memorialization of the Holocaust among Americans. It is considered to be one of the first signs of a new memorial culture that began to flourish in the 1960s. Carl Westmoreland will discuss the risks that society takes when it turns away from the examination of dark chapters in human history. In addition, he will illuminate ways in which we as a society might respond to those who say that "enough is enough". 

Because seating is limited, reservations are requested. Reservations can be made by contacting Sara Duplace at 513.221.1875 x3300 or sduplace@huc.edu. Admission is FREE. 

The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives, founded in 1947 by its namesake on the Cincinnati, Ohio, campus of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, is committed to preserving a documentary heritage of the religious, organizational, economic, cultural, personal, social and family life of American Jewry. The Marcus Center contains over 15,000 linear feet of archives, manuscripts, nearprint materials, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, and genealogical materials.


Founded in 1875, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion is North America's leading institution of higher Jewish education and the academic, spiritual, and professional leadership development center of Reform Judaism. HUC-JIR educates men and women for service to North American and world Jewry as rabbis, cantors, educators, and nonprofit management professionals, and offers graduate programs to scholars and clergy of all faiths. With centers of learning in Cincinnati, Jerusalem, Los Angeles, and New York, HUC-JIR's scholarly resources comprise the renowned Klau Library, The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives, research institutes and centers, and academic publications. In partnership with the Union for Reform Judaism and the Central Conference of American Rabbis, HUC-JIR sustains the Reform Movement's congregations and professional and lay leaders. HUC-JIR's campuses invite the community to cultural and educational programs illuminating Jewish heritage and fostering interfaith and multiethnic understanding. www.huc.edu