Rabbi Susan Einbinder, Ph.D., Receives Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship

Monday, May 3, 2004

Dr. Susan Einbinder, Professor of Medieval and Modern Hebrew Literature at HUC-JIR/Cincinnati, has been awarded the prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship, which will allow her to pursue research for future publications. Einbinder was one of 185 artists, scholars and scientists selected from more than 3,200 applicants for the 2004 awards, which total $6.9 million.

Guggenheim Fellows are appointed on the basis of distinguished achievement in the past and exceptional promise for future accomplishment.

Dr. Einbinder was ordained at HUC-JIR in 1983 and received her Ph.D. in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University in 1991. In 2002, she published Beautiful Death: Jewish Poetry and Martyrdom in Medieval France. Her current research focuses on the study of medieval literature of Jewish martyrdom. Earlier this year, Dr. Einbinder received two prestigious fellowships, which have allowed her to pursue research for future publications. The first, a fellowship for the fall semester of 2004 at the Institute of Advanced Studies, School of Historical Studies, located in Princeton, New Jersey and the second, a grant from the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia.

The Guggenheim Fellowship program considers applications in 79 different fields from the natural sciences to the creative arts. The new Fellows include writers, painters, sculptors, photographers, film makers, choreographers, physical and biological scientists, social scientists, and scholars in the humanities. Many of these individuals hold appointments in colleges and universities with 87 institutions being represented by one or more Fellows. Since 1925, the Foundation has granted more than $230 million in Fellowships to over 15,500 individuals.


Founded in 1875, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion is North America's leading institution of higher Jewish education and the academic, spiritual, and professional leadership development center of Reform Judaism. HUC-JIR educates men and women for service to North American and world Jewry as rabbis, cantors, educators, and nonprofit management professionals, and offers graduate programs to scholars and clergy of all faiths. With centers of learning in Cincinnati, Jerusalem, Los Angeles, and New York, HUC-JIR's scholarly resources comprise the renowned Klau Library, The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives, research institutes and centers, and academic publications. In partnership with the Union for Reform Judaism and the Central Conference of American Rabbis, HUC-JIR sustains the Reform Movement's congregations and professional and lay leaders. HUC-JIR's campuses invite the community to cultural and educational programs illuminating Jewish heritage and fostering interfaith and multiethnic understanding. www.huc.edu