Bringing in the Beat: An Evening of Jewish Women’s Music

Tuesday, April 1, 2003

May 7, 2003 at 6:00 pm
View the Exhibition with LILITH editors from 6-7 PM
Enjoy the latest in Jewish Women’s Music from 7-8 PM
Admission free, Photo ID required for entrance

Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion Museum
One West 4th Street (between Broadway and Mercer Street)
New York City

Traditionally, Jewish women were not permitted to sing out loud. No longer! In conjunction with the exhibit LILITH MAGAZINE: THE VOICE OF JEWISH WOMEN, come and hear the newest female voices on the Jewish music scene.

Among the performers singing out loud to celebrate LILITH Magazine and Israel Independence Day will be:

Violinist Alicia Svigals, who is considered by many to be the world's leading klezmer fiddler. She's a founder of the renowned Jewish roots groups the Klezmatics, and of her current band, the all-female Mikveh. As a musician and composer, she has worked with Itzhak Perlman, the Kronos Quartet, playwrights Tony Kushner and Eve Ensler, Allen Ginsburg, Led Zeppelin's Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, and singer/songwriter Debbie Friedman.

MIRAJ (Rabbi Margot L. Stein, Rabbi Rayzel Raphael, and Juliet Irene Spitzer). This a capella sings richly harmonic, original compositions. You'll hear songs for rituals old and new, offerings for Shabbat and holidays, and new interpretations of traditional liturgies. This will be the Philadelphia-based trio's first New York performance of the season.

Shira Shazeer of Boston's Fish Street Klezmer will perform part of the song cycle she has composed for the Yiddish poems of 19th century European Jewish poet, Rokhl Boymwol. She will be singing in Yiddish with an accordionist.

Arielle and Tamar (Arielle Freedberg and Tamar Prager), recent Barnard graduates who have a following in the downtown music scene, will sing Hebrew and English folk-rock and pop music accompanied with percussion and guitar.

Bringing in the Beat is part of a series of programs on Jewish women's issues presented in conjunction with LILITH Magazine: The Voice of Jewish Women, an exhibition celebrating more than 25 years of the award-winning independent Jewish women's magazine. Before and after the program, recordings of the participants' music will be available for sale, along with back issues of LILITH magazine and selected Jewish women's books. The exhibition is on view at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion Museum through June 27, 2003.

In 10 lively and revealing wall panels, the exhibition explores women's dramatic new roles in Jewish ritual and as rabbis and cantors, the changing face Jewish organizations and philanthropy, the new feminist scholarship, stereotypes, body image, and more. With fine art illustrations for the magazine, original manuscripts, iconic photographs, and memorabilia supporting Jewish women's roles in the world, the exhibition documents the impact of feminist Jewish journalism during the pivotal years since the magazine to publish, in 1976.

LILITH, the award-winning, nonprofit, independent national Jewish women's magazine, has been the voice of feminism for Jews since 1976. Jewish women and girls see new roles for themselves in its investigative reports, edgy scholarship, memoirs, news briefs, original fiction and poetry, reviews and resource listings, and a very lively take on traditions, celebrations, and social change.

For a sample copy of LILITH, visit www.lilithmag.com or call 1-888-2-LILITH. To hear late-breaking news about LILITH's music program on May 7, call (212) 824-2293.

Museum Hours: Mondays - Thursdays, 9 am - 5 pm; Fridays, 9 am - 3 pm Sunday, 10 am - 2 pm: April 27

Admission: Free. Photo ID required for entrance.

Curated tours for reporters/editors, group tours, and additional information: (212) 824-2205.

For further information about this and other programs associated with LILITH Magazine: The Voice of Jewish Women, please call 212-824-2293 or e-mailsschriever@huc.edu


Founded in 1875, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion is North America's leading institution of higher Jewish education and the academic, spiritual, and professional leadership development center of Reform Judaism. HUC-JIR educates men and women for service to North American and world Jewry as rabbis, cantors, educators, and nonprofit management professionals, and offers graduate programs to scholars and clergy of all faiths. With centers of learning in Cincinnati, Jerusalem, Los Angeles, and New York, HUC-JIR's scholarly resources comprise the renowned Klau Library, The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives, research institutes and centers, and academic publications. In partnership with the Union for Reform Judaism and the Central Conference of American Rabbis, HUC-JIR sustains the Reform Movement's congregations and professional and lay leaders. HUC-JIR's campuses invite the community to cultural and educational programs illuminating Jewish heritage and fostering interfaith and multiethnic understanding. www.huc.edu