Codes

Since Jewish laws are found in several places (Torah, Talmud, Tosefta, etc.) early rabbis and scholars tried to compile the various laws together in one source. These works include the Mishneh Torah, Shulhan Arukh, and the Tur.

 

 

Mishneh Torah (Yad ha-Hazakah)

The Mishneh Torah was written by Moses ben Maimon (also known as Maimonides or Rambam) in the late 12th century in Egypt. Because the Mishneh Torah is divided into 14 (i.e. yod+dalet) parts, it is also known as the Yad (yod+dalet) ha-Hazakah. The sections are: Ha-Mada' (Knowledge), Ahavah (Love [of God]), Zemanim (Times, holidays), Nashim (Women), Kedushah (Holiness), Hafla'ah (Separation), Zera'im (Seeds, agriculture), Avodah (Divine Service), Korbanot (Offerings), Tohorah (Ritual purity), Nezikin (Injuries), Kinyan (Acquisition), Mishpatim (Civil law), Shofetim (Judges).

On the Shelf
BM 520.84 (in this call number you will find original texts first, then translations, then criticism and commentaries)

Halakhot by Isaac ben Jacob Alfasi

Isaac ben Jacob Alfasi (also know as Rif from Rabbi Isaac Al-Fasi) was born in 1013 near the city of Fez in Morocco (thus he was know as al-Fasi - the "Fezite.") Alfasi's Halakhot is a digest of the Talmud. He compiled all the legal decisions from the tractates in the orders of Moed, Nashim and Nezikin as well as the tractates of Berachot and Chulin. He left out the aggadic material as well as the legal decisions that only applied in the land of Israel.

On the Shelf
BM 520.82 (in this call number you will find original texts first, then translations, then criticism and commentaries)

Arba'ah Turim by Jacob ben Asher

Arba'ah Turim (also known as the Tur) was written by Jacob ben Asher (a.k.a. Ba'al ha-turim, "author of the Turim") "Tur" means row, and this work is divided into four rows, or sections: Orach Chayim (laws of synagogue, prayer, holidays, etc) ; Yoreh De'ah (laws of ritual slaughter, and kashrut) ; Even ha-ezer (marriage, divorce) ; Choshen Mishpat (business and finance.) In the Tur, Jacob ben Asher expanded on work on the Halakhot by Alfasi. He compared Alfasi's text with Tosefists and Maimonides.

On the Shelf
BM 520.86 (in this call number you will find original texts first, then translations, then criticism and commentaries)

Bet Yosef & Shulhan 'Arukh by Joseph ben Ephraim Karo

While best known for his Shulhan 'Aruckh, Joseph ben Ephraim Karo's master work was actually the Bet Yosef, an expansive commentary on the Arba'ah Turim. Arranged into the same 4 sections as the Tur, the Bet Yosef, examines each legal decision mentioned in the Tur and compiles all the pertinent discussion from many different legal sources.
Years after the publication of the Bet Yosef, Karo put together a sort of students guide/digest of the Bet Yosef, and called it the Shulhan 'Arukh ("the set table")

On the Shelf

BM 520.88 (in this call number you will find original texts first, then translations, then criticism and commentaries)

Recommended websites

Codes

Bar Ilan Responsa Project

Includes the Hebrew texts of the Tanakh, Talmuds, early commentaries, codes, and many responsa. Searching is allowed from anywhere, more features are available (saving, printing, etc.) from the HUC campus or through the Jewish Studies Portal.

Mishneh Torah at Mechon Mamre

Hebrew text (with vowels). There is an English translation available of the preface. 

Sacred Jewish Texts at Snunit

This Hebrew site includes the Hebrew texts of the Tanakh, Mishnah, Tosefta, Talmud (Babylonian, and Jerusalem), Tosefta, and Mishneh Torah. Click one of the texts listed below the title. When viewing a text, you can highlight a word and them click on the dictionary icon floating on the left side for the English definition.

Writings of Maimonides

"In commemoration of the 800th anniversary of the death of Moses Maimonides, the Jewish National and University Library is proud to present to the public digital copies of Maimonides manuscripts and early printed editions from its collection. This project coincides with the Library's exhibit "The Great Eagle at the JNUL", and is part of the David and Fela Shapell Family Digitization Project at the JNUL"