Rabbinic Leadership: What Should a Rabbi Do? Executive Leadership Seminar for Rabbis - Oct. 12-13 at HUC-JIR/Los Angeles

Wednesday, September 30, 2009

A partnership of:

HUC-JIR School of Jewish Communal Service

Central Conference of American Rabbis

USC Marshall School of Business/Office of Executive Education

 

October 12-13, 2009 at HUC-JIR LA Campus

 

Bringing together the resources of the CCAR, the HUC-JIR School of Jewish Communal Service and the USC Marshall School of Business/Office of Executive Education, this intensive two-day seminar provides essential training in Executive Leadership for Rabbis using the most current applications of EQ (Emotional Intelligence) and Executive Communications.   By analyzing your personal leadership styles and understanding the communication styles of others, you will be better able to successfully manage professional relationships – whether with staff or lay leaders – and lead effective change in your congregation, organization and/or community.    

 

 

 

 Day One – Oct. 12

Faculty: James Owens

8:00am – 9:00am

 

9:00am – 9:30am

 

9:30am – 12:30pm

Registration and Coffee

 

Text Study/D’var Torah

 

Personal Leadership Style

12:30pm – 1:30pm

Lunch

 

 

1:30pm – 4:30pm

 

 

Executive Communications

 

4:30 – 5:00pm

 

 

 

Wrap Up of Key Takeaways

With Richard Siegel and

Rabbi Steven Fox

 

 

 

Personal Leadership Style

 

While you may have been exposed to the MBTI (Myer-Briggs Type Indicator) assessment in the past, this session will use the framework of MBTI in unique ways particularly applicable to the synagogual environment.  Through interactive exercises, participants will gain a better understanding of their EQ (Emotional Intelligence) and how it can be applied to enhance their work.  Issues related to personal leadership style affect the roles people assume in day-to-day activities and under stress (organizational challenges).  Each type style can and does think creatively, but understanding the differences can help you embrace your particular leadership style and creative process. 

 

Executive Communication

 

This session will enhance your understanding of EQ through experiential exercises designed to help you gain a deeper understanding of Executive Communication styles.  While we may not be able to change others, by understanding our communication style, we can better respond to both day-to-day and difficult situations, and influence decision making through more effective negotiation and persuasion.  As a result, participants will enhance their abilities to communicate and achieve win-win outcomes.

 

 

 

 

 

 Day Two – Oct 13

Faculty: Jody Tolan

8:30am – 9:00am

 

9:00am – 9:30am

 

9:30am – 12:30pm

 

 

 

Coffee

 

Text Study/D’var Torah

 

Understanding the Difference Between Leadership and Management

 

Improving Your Decision-Making Processes

12:30pm – 1:30pm

Lunch

1:30pm – 4:30pm

 

 

 

Improving Your Decision-Making Processes (con’t)

 

The Challenges of Working in Teams

4:30 – 5:00pm

 

 

Wrap Up of Key Takeaways

With Richard Siegel and

Rabbi Steven Fox

 

 

 

 

Understanding the Difference Between Leadership and Management

 

Building on the lessons from Day One, we will discuss the differences between being a Leader and being a Manager, centering around a classic Harvard Business Review article by John Kotter.   While people often believe that leadership is just a better form of management, in reality, leadership and management require different skills and approaches.  This session will include exercises for participants to reflect on their own responsibilities as managers and leaders – when are management skills required, when are leadership skills required – and create a game plan to address the personal challenges of juggling these two roles. 

 

 

Improving Your Decision-Making Processes

 

Whether leader or manager, we are faced with all types of decisions throughout the day.  Many groups and organizations jump right into making important decisions with little regard for effective process.  This session discusses different decision making processes to reduce conflict, leverage the diversity in the team/group, and improve the chances of a successful outcome.  Using scenarios drawn from rabbinic experiences, we will use the MBTI to identify the most effective approaches with different groups, stakeholders and individuals. 

 

The Challenges of Working in Teams

 

Processes are helpful, but the bottom line is that we are dealing with individuals when working in teams and groups.  The seminar will conclude with interactive exercises that illustrate the differences and challenges of working with others in teams or groups.  Reflecting how type and temperament influence behavior, we will conduct a personal mapping exercise that identifies strategies that provide insight into the team effectiveness and performance.  

 

 

 

FACULTY

 

James Owens (MBA, MPW) is Assistant Professor of Clinical Management Communication at the USC Marshall School of Business.  Coming to Marshall in 1996 from the corporate world, James is an expert in professional management communication, including oral, written, and interpersonal skills. He has extensive international business experience in England, France, Germany, Africa, and Saudi Arabia for companies including Louis Vuitton, Coca-Cola, Agfa-Gevaert, and Bain Consulting.

 

He has authored more than 100 articles published in local, national and international magazines. James also interviews senior executives including Fortune 500 CEOs and Chairpersons for his "Marshall Asks" and "Profiles in Business" columns published by the Marshall School. He is working on an anthology of interviews with prominent people from around the world to help promote the world's largest non-governmental adult literacy organization, ProLiteracy Worldwide.  He is a certified MBTI Administrator and has extensive experience in training corporate professionals and executives on the development of their communication skills and leadership traits.

 

Jody Tolan (MBA) is a full-time Lecturer in the Department of Management and Organization at the USC Marshall School of Business.  With her expertise in leadership and organizational development, she has designed and facilitated numerous programs in Marshall’s Office of Executive Education for the acquisition of business skills in marketing, accounting, strategy, team building, and other related topics.  Consulting with clients such as Wescom Credit Union, Honda Financial Services, Allergan, BDO Seidman and Thailand Government Savings Bank, Professor Tolan has created programs to build leadership skills among emerging managers, middle managers and senior executive teams to meet strategic and organizational goals. 

 

Prior to her work at USC, Ms. Tolan held several positions with various boutique consulting firms in New York City, primarily focusing on strategic corporate communications, strategic marketing and strategy development for domestic and international clients.  She began her professional career working as a staff assistant for US Senator Paul Tsongas in Washington, DC followed by a founding role in the Democratic Leadership Council as Assistant Director.  She holds a B.A. in American Government and International Relations from Smith College and an MBA from USC.  She currently resides in Pasadena, California and is active in Pasadena’s Tournament of Roses which presents the annual Tournament of Roses Parade and football game.

 

 

 

SPONSORS

 

Richard A. Siegel, Director, HUC-JIR, School of Jewish Communal Service

Rabbi Deborah Prinz, Director of Program and Member Services, CCAR

Jaclyn Conner, Director, Program Design & Development. USC Marshall School of Business, Office of Executive Education


Founded in 1875, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion is North America's first institution of higher Jewish education and the academic, spiritual, and professional leadership development center of Reform Judaism. HUC-JIR educates men and women for service to North American and world Jewry as rabbis, cantors, educators, and nonprofit management professionals, and offers graduate programs to scholars and clergy of all faiths. With centers of learning in Cincinnati, Jerusalem, Los Angeles, and New York, HUC-JIR's scholarly resources comprise the renowned Klau Library, the American Jewish Archives, research institutes and centers, and academic publications. In partnership with the Union for Reform Judaism and the Central Conference of American Rabbis, HUC-JIR sustains the Reform Movement's congregations and professional and lay leaders. HUC-JIR's campuses invite the community to cultural and educational programs illuminating Jewish heritage and fostering interfaith and multiethnic understanding. www.huc.edu