Leslie A. Golomb and Louise Silk: Deez Nites Be All Da Same To Me

Tuesday, February 1, 2005

February 14 - June 30, 2005 

Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion Museum
One West 4th Street (between Broadway and Mercer Street)
Manhattan, New York 

The historic fate of two separate groups of people, Jews and African Americans, distanced by a span of three millennia, are linked together through the artistry of Leslie Golomb Hartman and Louise Silk. These two renowned fiber artists have created a series of quilts depicting the linked story of a Jewish slave-owning family, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Lyons Moss, and their runaway slave boy. The inescapable parallel between the Jewish Exodus from Egypt, as related in the Passover Haggadah, and the flight to freedom experienced by the boy are visually linked with symbolic images and text. 

The artists, using actual motifs from historic quilts sewn by slave women and indicating the route to safe houses along the underground railroad, also borrow text from the Haggadah, patterns from contemporary African trade textiles, and the recognizable form of the matzah. The use of mid-nineteenth-century silhouettes to depict the family members, is echoed by the recurring profile of the boy. 

Hartman and Silk have received numerous awards for their collaborative work, including the Art of the State Award, given by the State Museum of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship in Crafts for 2002. Their work has appeared extensively in diverse publications. 

For a pdf of the exhibition catalog, please see click here

School/Group Tours: 212-824-2205 

Admission Free; Photo ID required 

Hours: Mondays- Thursdays, 9 am - 5 pm; Fridays, 9 am - 3 pm; Selected Sun., 10 am - 2 pm, Oct. 3, 17; Nov. 7, 21; Dec. 5, 19; Jan. 9. Admission: Free. Photo ID required, www.huc.edu/museum/ny. Curated Tours for reporters/editors, group tours, and additional information: (212) 824-2205


Founded in 1875, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion is North America's first institution of higher Jewish education and the academic, spiritual, and professional leadership development center of Reform Judaism. HUC-JIR educates men and women for service to North American and world Jewry as rabbis, cantors, educators, and nonprofit management professionals, and offers graduate programs to scholars and clergy of all faiths. With centers of learning in Cincinnati, Jerusalem, Los Angeles, and New York, HUC-JIR's scholarly resources comprise the renowned Klau Library, the American Jewish Archives, research institutes and centers, and academic publications. In partnership with the Union for Reform Judaism and the Central Conference of American Rabbis, HUC-JIR sustains the Reform Movement's congregations and professional and lay leaders. HUC-JIR's campuses invite the community to cultural and educational programs illuminating Jewish heritage and fostering interfaith and multiethnic understanding. www.huc.edu