Samuel Greengus, Ph.D

Contact Information

Phone: 
513-221-7444
Extension: 
3243
Julian Morgenstern Professor Emeritus of Bible and Near Eastern Literature; Professor of Semitic Languages

HUC-JIR/Cincinnati

Dr. Greengus is the Julian Morgenstern Professor Emeritus of Bible and Near Eastern Literature and Professor of Semitic Languages at HUC-JIR/Cincinnati. He earned an M.A. in Judaic Studies and a Ph.D. in Assyriology at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. He has been teaching in Cincinnati since 1963. He has also served as Dean of the Rabbinical School, (1979-84) Director of the School of Graduate Studies(1985-90), and Vice-President for Academic Affairs(1990-96). His specialties, in addition to Semitic languages, are Bible, Rabbinics and Ancient History.

Selected Publications and Edited Works

Laws in the Bible and in Early Rabbinic Collections: The Legal Legacy of the Ancient Near East. Cascade Books, Wipf and Stock, Eugene, Oregon, 2011 (forthcoming).

Old Babylonian Tablets from Ishchali and Vicinity, Nederlands Historisch-Archaeologisch Instituut te Istanbul vol. XLIV. Leiden, 1979.

Studies in Ishchali Documents, Bibliotheca Mesopotamica vol. 19. Malibu: Undena Publications, 1986.

"Covenant in Ancient Israel: An Historical View (tentative title)." History of Ancient Israel, Bill T. Arnold and Richard S. Hess, ed., Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Academic Press (in preparation).

"Foreword to Studies in the Book of the Covenant in Light of Cuneiform and Biblical law, by Shalom M. Paul. Dover Studies in Bible, Language, and History. (Eugene, Oregon: Wipf and Stock, 2006)

"Biblical and Mesopotamian Law: An Amorite Connection?" Daily Life in the Ancient Near East , R. Averbeck and D.W. Weisberg , ed., CDL Press, Baltimore, 2003) 63-81

"Redefining 'Inchoate Marriage' in Old Babylonian Contexts" in Studies in the Ancient Near East in Memory of Thorkild Jacobsen, (ed. T. Abusch: Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2002) 121-137.

"New Evidence on the Old Babylonian Calendar and Real Estate Documents from Sippar," Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (2001): 257-267.